Natives in the Landscape

Native Settlements
Native towns were located along the edges of the rivers, adjacent to marshes, and near to high, level, well-drained fields. Because Native people practiced shifting cultivation – moving from old fields to new as the soil wore out – their villages tended over the years to move up and down the river’s edge.

© 2006 Charles City County

Weyanock

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People
The Weyanock population is estimated to have been about 600 in the contact era. Like the Paspaheghs, the Weyanocks were relatively late additions to Powhatan paramount chiefdom. They represented a lucrative trading partner, with connections to the Iroquois to the south. The Weroance residing on the north side of the river was named Kaquothocum. A second Weroance governing the south side of the river was named Ohoroquoh. Following the Second Great Assault 1644-46 the Weyanocks moved far to the south of the James eventually merging with the Nansemonds and Nottoways.

Territory
The Weyanocks controlled territory on both sides of the James River from Flowerdew Hundred on the south side west to the Appomattox River on the south side and from Gunns Run to Turkey Island Creek on the north side. While their semi-permanent villages lay within the area indicated on the map the territory they controlled for purposes of hunting, foraging and fishing was much larger.

Towns
John Smith’s map indicates eight Weyanock towns. The four unnamed towns on the north side of the river are located at the western end of modern day Charles City County. Villages on the south side of the River in modern Prince George County are located between Chippokes Creek and Jordan Point. The Chief’s town on the northern side of the river was located near modern-day Shirley Plantation. The Chief’s town on the south side of the river was located near the head of Powell’s Creek.

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Learn about the Chickahominy tribe. Learn about the Paspahegh tribe. Learn about the Weyanock tribe.